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In about a third of married or cohabiting couples in the United States, women bring in half or more of the earnings, a ificant increase from the past. Men are especially likely to place a greater emphasis on their role as financial providers.

The nationally representative survey of 4, adults was conducted Aug. In roughly two-thirds of married or cohabiting couples, men earn more than women. As women in the U. These trends, along with the fact that women with higher levels of education and income are more likely to marry, have boosted the economic status of married households. Today, married adults are much more likely to live in upper-income households than are non-married adults. At the same time, income dynamics among couples have shifted.

The relative financial contributions of men and women differ ificantly by the educational attainment of each partner. Views about who should be providing for family diverge along socio-economic lines. The pattern is similar when it comes to a woman being a good wife or partner.

Adults in lower-income families are more likely than those in higher-income families to say being able to financially support a family is very important for making a man or woman a good spouse or partner. There are age differences as well.

Adults ages 65 and older, for instance, are more likely than younger age groups to say that a man should be able to provide financial support for his family. But the different expectations for men and women persist across age groups.

College graduates place more importance on having a well-educated spouse or partner. Views also differ across demographic groups when it comes to other attributes of spouses or partners. But men and women have somewhat different views about the importance of this attribute in women. Younger adults view contributing to chores around the house as about equally important for men and for women, but older adults are more likely to see this as an important attribute for women than for men.

As far as educational attainment, men and women overall tend to agree on the importance of a man or a woman being well educated in order to make a good spouse or partner. But college graduates are more likely than those with lower levels of education to say this is very important. Blacks and Hispanics are also more likely than whites to emphasize the importance of being well educated in order for a man or a woman to be a good spouse or partner. Note: See full topline and methodology here PDF. Fresh data delivered Saturday mornings. Pew Research Center now uses as the last birth year for Millennials in our work.

President Michael Dimock explains why. Republican- and Democratic-led states alike already require hundreds of thousands of citizens to be vaccinated against various diseases. On key economic outcomes, single adults at prime working age increasingly lag behind those who are married or cohabiting. About Pew Research Center Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world.

It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research. Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. It is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts. Newsletters Donate My . Research Topics. In roughly two-thirds of married or cohabiting couples, men earn more than women As women in the U.

College graduates place more importance on having a well-educated spouse or partner Views also differ across demographic groups when it comes to other attributes of spouses or partners. Share this link:. Kim Parker is director of social trends research at Pew Research Center. Renee Stepler is a former research analyst who focused on social and demographic trends research at Pew Research Center.

Rising Share of U. Two-thirds of U. Follow Us.

Secure stable married woman looking for girlfriends

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